Few people, including New York residents, want to consider themselves victims. It may make them feel weak or as if they have been irreparably damaged. As a result, individuals who have endured sexual harassment often prefer to refer to themselves as survivors. However, many men who have experienced such harassment may feel reluctant to refer to themselves at all in relation to the topic.

It was recently reported that one in five sexual harassment claims filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission come from male victims. Often, the harassment occurs due to co-workers perceiving these men as being less masculine, and as a result, the others attempt to dominate and humiliate those they consider weaker. It tends to prove difficult for men to complain about harassing actions at work, and unfortunately, sometimes when they do complain, no action is taken to address the problem.

One man faced such an issue while he was on the job. Reports stated that another male worker often made crude comments and spread rumors, claiming that the man performed sexual acts on the other worker. The man endured this treatment for three years, and after complaining to a supervisor, he was brushed off and told that the other worker would soon retire anyway. As a result, the man took further action and filed a claim with the EEOC.

No matter how a person wishes to refer to him or herself after facing sexual harassment on the job, that individual still has options for addressing the mistreatment. If complaints to management get swept under the rug, New York residents may wish to take this man’s actions as an example and consider taking legal action. Information on filing lawsuits in relation to this type of harassment may prove useful to interested parties.

Source: nypost.com, “The surprising number of men who complain of workplace sexual harassment”, Tamar Lapin, April 9, 2018